My New Book Deal

I’m so excited to announce that the subject of MY NEXT BOOK will be on the birth of plastic surgery told through the incredible story of Harold Gillies, the pioneering and eccentric surgeon who first united art and medicine to address the horrific injures that resulted from World War I.

From the moment that the “Dhak! Dhak! Dhak! Dhak!” of the first machine gun rang out over the Western Front, one thing was clear: mankind’s military technology at the start of WWI wildly outpaced its medical capabilities. Bullets whizzed through the air at incredible speeds, discharging as much as 7,200 horsepower of energy in a single shot. Shells and mortar bombs exploded with a force that flung men around the battlefield like rag dolls. And a deadly new threat in the form of hot chunks of shrapnel—coated in the filth and bacteria of the battlefield—wrought terrible injuries on its victims. Had it not been for the heroic efforts of one man, these soldiers would have also been condemned to a lifetime of isolation.

My book will follow the story of Harold Gillies [pictured right, copyright: Dr. Andrew Bamji] who was presented with the seemingly impossible task of reconstructing entire faces with no textbooks to guide him, and no mentors to consult for advice. Working closely with a team of artists, Gillies did not just strive to restore function to his patients, many of whom could not breathe, swallow, or eat efficiently because of the damage to their faces. He was determined to give them back their identities as well. Here, you see an incredible example of reconstructive work from this era.

I can’t wait to share this inspiring story with the world.

As with all good news, there is a bittersweet side to this announcement. I’m thrilled to be working with my wonderful publisher FSG again, but sadly my editor Amanda Moon will be leaving next month to begin her own consulting business. She will be sorely missed, though I’m looking forward to working with the brilliant Colin Dickerman on this second project.

By | 2018-03-07T14:36:30+00:00 February 21st, 2018|BLOG, Casebooks|28 Comments

28 Comments

  1. Carolyn Breit February 21, 2018 at 9:46 pm - Reply

    Just tell me when I can pre-order, lady! I will be first in line!

  2. Nuri February 21, 2018 at 9:50 pm - Reply

    Congrats, can’t wait to read it. I rather fell in love with Lister and his gentle bedside manner so I’m excited to see how you bring Gillies to life.

    • Lindsey Fitzharris February 22, 2018 at 1:38 pm - Reply

      I’m so pleased to hear that you enjoyed THE BUTCHERING ART. I also fell in love with Lister and his gentle character. I’m excited to get started with this new project.

  3. Jan Helldén February 21, 2018 at 10:13 pm - Reply

    A very fascinating subject. Looking very Munch forward to read the finishen book ???

  4. William Alton Smith,Jr. M.D. (Bill) February 21, 2018 at 10:23 pm - Reply

    The Royal Army Dental Corps Museum which used to be at Aldershot, used to House the collection of Gilles’ instruments, many of which he devised himself. Several books are out on the topic of WW1 and the subsequent development of plastic surgery. Tonks was an interesting man. A good book that needs to be researched and written is the history of art and plastic surgery….esp. looking at Charles Bell.

    • Dr Andrew Bamji February 22, 2018 at 9:25 am - Reply

      Hi Bill,

      See my book which covers Tonks and the Sidcup artists: Faces from the front (http://blog.helion.co.uk/tag/faces-from-the-front/).

      You probably know that Charles Bell’s drawings and paintings are in the Edinburgh College of Surgeons. These pre-date any significant plastic surgery attempts, of course. The Otis collection contains a number of before-and-after photographs from the American Civil War, and these underline the poor results obtained in the 19th Century.

    • Lindsey Fitzharris February 22, 2018 at 1:36 pm - Reply

      Thanks for your message, Bill. I’ve been fascinated with Charles Bell’s work since I began researching Joseph Lister for THE BUTCHERING ART. I very much hope to explore broader themes in this new book about the merging of art and plastic surgery. It will go beyond the scope of WW1 to take into account Gillies’s later career. I’m really looking forward to it!

  5. Heather February 21, 2018 at 11:44 pm - Reply

    Congratulations………I can’t wait to get my wee hands on your next book. Thank you for sharing your talent with all of us. Love ❤️ from Canada ??.

    • Lindsey Fitzharris February 22, 2018 at 1:37 pm - Reply

      Thank you for your interest in my work!

  6. Carolyn Goodrich February 22, 2018 at 12:20 am - Reply

    Can’t wait.

  7. Mary Ann Rose, MD February 22, 2018 at 1:17 am - Reply

    Lindsey, my father, Dr. Melvin Spira, is the retired Chief of Plastic Surgery at Baylor College of Medicine and has just had a named Professorship established in his honor. He is 92 years old and has seen many many changes in the focus and scope of plastic surgery in his long career. He absolutely LOVED your first book, which I gave him for Christmas. I’m sure he would be delighted to talk to you if you want to. He trained hundreds of the world’s leading plastic surgeons over his 60 year career.

    • Dr Andrew Bamji February 22, 2018 at 9:20 am - Reply

      Hi Mary Ann

      Your father may be interested in my book published last year, called “Faces from the Front (http://blog.helion.co.uk/tag/faces-from-the-front/).

      Regards

      Andrew

    • Lindsey Fitzharris February 22, 2018 at 1:30 pm - Reply

      Hi Mary Ann,

      That’s wonderful to hear! I’m so pleased your father enjoyed THE BUTCHERING ART. I would love to speak with him further about his incredible career. Would you mind dropping me an email via the contact page so we can correspond more privately?

      Thank you,
      Lindsey

  8. Maureen Correa February 22, 2018 at 2:31 am - Reply

    Hi Lindsay! Hope you are doing well and thanks for the update! I was wondering what you were up to. Can’t wait to see your next step! Kindly, Maureen

  9. Maureen Correa February 22, 2018 at 2:33 am - Reply

    P.S. How is the cutest grandma Dorothy???

    • Lindsey Fitzharris February 22, 2018 at 1:03 pm - Reply

      Aw! Maureen! Grandma is doing well. I’m actually in NYC at the moment but heading to Chicago soon to see her. Ever since the first book came out, my life has been a bit crazy. I’m hoping to get back to blogging more soon! Thanks for keeping in touch.

  10. Dr Andrew Bamji February 22, 2018 at 9:18 am - Reply

    Rather surprised to see this.My definitive book about Gillies was published last year after 20 years of research: “Faces from the Front”, Helion Press, see http://blog.helion.co.uk/tag/faces-from-the-front/. I note that one of the images you have used is nothing to do with Gillies and the other is my copyright.

    Dr Andrew Bamji
    Gillies Archivist
    British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons

    • Lindsey Fitzharris February 22, 2018 at 12:36 pm - Reply

      Thanks for your comments, Dr Bamji. I am, of course, aware of your excellent book. My own will be narrative nonfiction, written in the style of a novel; and I will be taking a much wider look at Gillies and plastic surgery’s longer history. The book won’t be out for several years. I hope you enjoy it when it finally emerges. In the meantime, best of luck with your own. I wasn’t aware that the image of Gillies was under copyright. I will gladly credit it, or if you wish, remove it from this post. I’ll wait to hear from you. -Lindsey Fitzharris

  11. Jean James February 23, 2018 at 3:43 pm - Reply

    Congratulations on your new book. I’ll have to pick up a copy and leave it at the nurses station for our plastic surgeons to check out, that is after I’m done reading it of course!

  12. Juliet Roberts February 24, 2018 at 11:28 am - Reply

    I await this book with interest! My Masters thesis was on the essential role of art in the management of facial injury in the Frist World War, and I had access to some excellent sources, but a little too early for Dr Bamji’s excellent book! Good luck with the project!

    • Lindsey Fitzharris February 24, 2018 at 3:13 pm - Reply

      Hi Julie! I believe I’ve heard about your Masters thesis from my friend Dr. Bill MacLehose. Were you a student at UCL? I’m just embarking on my research journey and would love to read it. I’m very excited about this next book. Gillies will be a jumping off point for a much broader look at plastic surgery as a whole.

      • Juliet Roberts February 24, 2018 at 3:36 pm - Reply

        Hi Lindsey! In fact I did my Masters at the University of Luxembourg. The thesis is entitled ‘Seen and Unseen: The Essential Role of Art in the Management of Facial Injury in World War I’ and I would be delighted to pass it on to you! I will email it to you now and I hope you enjoy it! Juliet

  13. Lindsey Fitzharris February 24, 2018 at 3:39 pm - Reply

    That is wonderful! I really appreciate it, Juliet. And will, of course, fully cite and credit your work in the upcoming book. As I said: I’m at the very early stages having just finished an intense book tour with the first. But very eager to jump in! THANK YOU!

    • Juliet Roberts February 24, 2018 at 5:25 pm - Reply

      How exciting! Thank you! I’ve just messaged you through this website for an email address to which I can attach the thesis.

  14. Cassie April 17, 2018 at 2:17 am - Reply

    Just finished The Butchering Art and I absolutely loved it. I’ve always had an interest in history and currently work in the medical field. You’ve beautifully combined two of my loves and I can’t wait to read your next book! I am thrilled there will be more fascinating stories told in your unique way.

    • Lindsey Fitzharris April 17, 2018 at 3:26 pm - Reply

      What kind words! Thank you, Cassie! I’m excited to dig into this new book.

    • Plastic Man April 27, 2018 at 4:15 pm - Reply

      Good to hear. I read ‘The Butchering Art’ late last year whilst I was in London visiting surgeons at UCLH, and staying in Paddington close to St Mary’s. It was particularly interesting to read about medical history that happened nearby. Gillies is an interesting character – whilst there is no doubt he contributed a great deal – some would argue with some validity, that he also hindered the development of microvascular reconstructive surgery.

  15. Gretchen April 23, 2018 at 1:54 am - Reply

    Saw an article about you and “The Butchering Art” in my local paper – The Bloomington Pantagraph – which I know you are ‘familiar’ with:) Being in health care, I loved the book! I’m looking forward to your next one!

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